4 Indigenous-Owned Hair Brands You Should Absolutely Know About

11/03/2021

November marks Native American Heritage Month, a time to celebrate the cultures, traditions, and important contributions of Native people. While there are so many ways that you can show your support for the Indigenous community during these month-long festivities (and beyond!), we highly suggest throwing your money behind some Native-owned business, particularly ones in the hair space. 

It’s no secret that Indigenous people have continued to be vastly underrepresented in the hair industry. In fact, you may have even noticed this yourself the last time you walked down the aisle of your favorite beauty store and failed to come across even a single hair product from an Indigenous-owned brand. 

That’s why we’re taking the time to shine a spotlight on a few of our favorite brands that are owned and operated by members of the Native American community. These brands are not only creating high-quality — often handcrafted — products, but they are doing so while also honoring their heritage and traditions. 

Here, four Indigenous-owned brands to support now—and always. 

Sister Sky

The brainchild of sisters, Monica Simeon and Marina TurnigRob—who are both citizens of the Spokane Tribe in Washington State—Sister Sky is a certified Native American, women-owned company producing natural haircare products that honor their Native roots. All of their hair products as well as their lotions and bath bombs are created using plant-based ingredients such as sweet grass, white willow, and sage that have been harvested by their Native American grandmothers. 

Recommended Product: Sister Sky Sweetgrass Shampoo, $12.50

Kokom Scrunchies

What started as a fundraising idea to support her local powwow has since blossomed into a successful hair accessories brand, called Kokom Scrunchies, for 10-year-old Mya, who is Algonquin from the Kitigan Zibi Reserve in Ottawa, Canada. Inspired by her grandmother—”kokom” translates to grandmother in Algonquin language—the young entrepreneur creates beautiful handmade scrunchies from traditional Indigenous kokum scarves (floral patterned scarves that are typically worn as head coverings by Indigenous elders). 

Recommended Product: Kokom Scrunchies White Beaded Hummingbird Scrunchie, $10.00

Ketahli Beauty

Founder Latoya Ashwin, a Noongar mom of four, created Ketahli Beauty as a way to honor the beauty of her people, especially the too often overlooked women who are the backbone of Aboriginal families. The name Ketahli comes from a combination of her three daughters’ names: Ke—Keahni, Tah—Tahkara, and Li—Maharlie. All of the hair products from this Australian-based brand are created in small batches and made from native Australian ingredients that are not only ethically sourced, but have been used by their ancestors for thousands of years.

Recommended Product: Ketahli Beauty Repair Me Mask, $35.00

The Yukon Soaps Company

For over twenty years, founder Joella Hogan has been making handcrafted natural soaps, essential oils, and grooming products in Yukon, Canada — hence the name, Yukon Soaps Company. Coming from a long line of Indigenous women, Hogan continues to honour her Northern Tutchone heritage with her company by using local plants such as Boreal plants and wild rose petals in her formulations, using Na-cho Nyak Dun plant knowledge, and by sprinkling in Northern Tutchone language in wherever she can. 

Recommended Product: Wild Side Shave Soap, $12.00

Are you currently obsessed with any Indigenous-owned hair products or brands? Share with us below!

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Camille Nzengung

Camille Nzengung is a Features Editor at The Tease, where she covers all things hair. You can find her writing about the best hair products, the coolest hair trends, and all the exciting new hair launches.

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